Action Alert: Parks need your help


Your parks need your voice!

City of Boston officials are working on next year’s budget right now. Please join us in reminding Mayor Walsh how important parks are to you by requesting an increase in the parks and recreation budget.
Parks greatly improve the quality of life and build community.  The time is now to share your voice on their behalf.
Decisions being made right now by City of Boston officials will determine next year’s budget.  These decisions will impact the quality of parks and recreational opportunities. The status quo simply won’t get us the kind of open spaces our community needs to thrive. It’s time for Parks & Recreation to receive a budget increase.
Will you take 5 minutes this week to send an e-mail to Mayor Walsh? 


Sample email message:
Dear Mayor Walsh,
I am asking that you increase funding for Boston’s parks in the upcoming budget. (INCLUDE A SENTENCE ABOUT THE PARK YOU ARE INVOLVED IN/USE MOST.)
Having parks that are safe and well-maintained is a basic requirement, and yet some of our park aren’t meeting that standard. It is more cost effective for the City to maintain its parks than to have major capital expenses for deferred maintenance. In addition to these basics, it’s important for city parks to have high-quality programming, to provide community members and visitors of all ages and backgrounds attractive opportunities to come together for recreation, arts and culture events, and more.
Will you provide increased funding for our parks? Please let me know if you will make this one of your top budget priorities.
Thank you for your consideration.
Your name
Your address

Action alert: Gas leak bills need support


Dear Friends,

There is an important bill in the State House that needs to be moved out of committee by March 15, which will have a very important impact on getting gas leaks fixed in Boston. The bill is H2870, An Act relative to protecting consumers of gas and electricity from paying for leaked gas.” (We were pleased to see that H2871 “An Act relative to gas leak repairs during road projects” made it out of Committee.) The Friends of the Public Garden is interested in this as it relates to trees and the greenspaces we care for and the overall urban health of our community. The impact the leaks have on the trees of the Commonwealth Avenue Mall are of particular concern to us because they are at greatest risk of damage from the leaks.

We have reached out to our representatives and are urging you to do the same. We are pleased to be joined by the Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay, Garden Club of Back Bay, and several other community organizations from across the city. Please feel free to use the template below.

Template letter:

Dear Representative XX:

I respectfully urge you to contact Representative Thomas Golden, the House chairman of the Telecom, Utilities and Energy Committee, and urge him to report out Representative Lori Ehrlich’s gas leak bill H2870 favorably by March 15. We were pleased to see that H2871 was reported out favorably but your support is still needed.

Gas leaks are a major concern in our neighborhood, throughout Boston and the state. One year ago a Harvard-BU study found that leaks from natural gas distribution pipes cost ratepayers $90 million a year in greater Boston. Gas leaks also cause explosions: they blew one Boston home off its foundation in 2014, displacing 11 residents, and another in 2015. Gas leaks contribute to asthma, a major health problem in Boston; kill trees by displacing oxygen in the soil; and they are probably Boston’s #1 greenhouse gas. Methane, the main component of natural gas, is 86 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide during its first 20 years in the atmosphere. Given that, the Boston Climate Action Network estimates that gas leaks are a bigger climate change factor than all the vehicles in Boston.

The Legislature acted on this issue in 2014. The gas leaks bill it passed that year required gas utilities to report all their known leaks to the Department of Public Utilities and to repair or replace hazardous leaks promptly. Unfortunately, those repairs are not keeping pace with new leaks in Boston’s century-old, leak-prone distribution system. Central Boston, including the Back Bay, started 2015 with 201 known leaks and it now has 232.

Rep. Ehrlich’s two bills would incentivize faster repairs and would fix all the leaks within a decade. The first bill, H2870, would require utilities to pay for the gas their pipes are leaking instead of charging their customers. The second, H2871 would require them to fix all leaks when a street is opened up for substantial repairs.

Please contact Representative Golden and urge him to report these two important bills out of TUE favorably before this session’s March 15deadline. Also please contact Speaker DeLeo and tell him of your concern about this issue.


Meet the Trees: The Beeches


In midwinter it is not uncommon to have intermittent mild days that tantalize us with reminders of spring. Walking through a park on a warm February day, we might even look to the trees for some confirmation that spring is around the corner—a swelling bud or hint of green, perhaps? Alas, all we’ll note are markers not of the season to come but of the season past: some branches retain from the fall a few straggling, brown leaves. In Boston parks, the only trees that do this are beeches and oaks—both in the same family: the Fagaceae. The botanical word for leaves that remain on trees well into or through the winter is marcescent (from the Latin marcere, meaning enfeebled or withered). Such papery leaves hold fast until the wind rips them free, or until the emerging bud of the spring leaf pushes them off. Scientists speculate that the abscission layer, which forms in most deciduous trees to cut leaves off in the fall, is delayed for some of the leaves of beeches, resulting in a characteristically half-dressed look. In the wild, American Beeches (Fagus grandifolia) form mature forest in parts of central New England alongside Sugar Maples (Acer saccharum). These forests are strikingly beautiful as the Beech often reproduces vegetatively, through sprouts from roots or from rooted branches. This can result in a mother tree surrounded by her offspring in a circle, or, if she is dead, a perfect circle of beech trees of uniform age—a fairy circle in the forest.

All but one of the beeches in our Parks, however, are cultivars of European Beech (Fagus sylvatica). There are some striking horticultural forms represented in the collection, including the Pendula cultivar, with weeping, sweeping limbs; the Rotundifolia, with dark blackish-green leaves and a beautiful, round canopy, and the Asplenifolia, or fern-leafed variety, with lacy cut leaf margins: and the Spaethiana,which holds its deep purple color longer and emerges in the spring with a rich burgundy color. It is fitting that the sole American Beech in our parks is found on the Boston Common, just north of the Frog Pond, as one looks toward Beacon Street.

The Friends of the Public Garden cares for 14 Beech trees in the Garden, some of which date back to the original plantings during the 1870s. These older specimens are special both because of their age and size, but also their placement—three of the oldest are near the Bagheera and Triton’s Baby’s fountains near the mid-block Charles Street crossing. One venerable specimen reaches out over the pathway and over the Bagheera fountain, with a large branch that has rooted in the bed beyond and is cabled to its multi-stemmed main trunk. This tree, which may be over 150 years old, is in its decline, but the Friends work seeks to prolong its lifespan. To do so, we may need to reduce the weight of the wood in the crown, since it has significant interior rot and is vulnerable to wind damage because of its weakened wood. Click here to learn more about load reduction pruning in the Public Garden, Boston Common, and Commonwealth Avenue Mall.

One striking feature of ornamental Beech trees is their bark, which is characteristically smooth and light grey, like an elephant’s skin. Their beautiful bark is unfortunately threatened by two major concerns: vandalism by humans, and a suite of fungal diseases. The Friends of the Public Garden works tirelessly on both of these issues. Together with the Parks Department of the City of Boston, the Friends strives to maintain these parks at the highest level of excellence, to inspire the public to love and respect these important public resources (and refrain from vandalizing them!) And most significantly, the Friends hires hard-working professionals who use the latest scientific practices of Integrated Pest Management to treat the beeches for fungal bark diseases, such as the phythoptera canker and nectria.

Across from the Hampshire House and Cheers, one finds a grove of Beech trees, planted in the 1980’s by two significant early Friends of the Public Garden, Polly Wakefield and Westy Lovejoy. Both woman were long-term members of the Board and Horticulture Committee. This cluster of trees, a testament to these two volunteers’ many years of service, is thriving thanks to the careful pruning, disease management, and judicious fertilizing the Friends has provided over the decades. I like to imagine that in 150 years a new generation of park lovers will look up at the marcescent leaves and wonder when spring will ever arrive.


Claire Corcoran is an ecologist and member of the Friends of the Public Garden Board of Directors. She is a self proclaimed “tree hugger” and dedicated advocate for greenspace in Boston and beyond. Claire lives in the South End of Boston with her husband and three children.


Photos by Claire Corcoran

Monitoring Shadow Impacts on our Parks

Boston Common by Caroline Phillips-Licari
Boston Common (Caroline Phillips-Licari)


From the 1970s, our advocacy for the Common, the Garden and the Mall has included protecting them from excessive shadow and wind resulting from development near the parks that would have a damaging impact on these centrally important greenspaces and the people who come to enjoy them.

We believe that development is essential to the vitality of Boston. We also appreciate that it brings new life and positive activity to our parks, and have seen this benefit in the recent growth of the Downtown Crossing residential and college communities. Recently, a project has been proposed across the street from the Common (171-172 Tremont Street) that exceeds the height limit of the Boston Common and Public Garden Protection Zone of the Midtown Cultural District. We are advocating for compliance with both the 1990 Shadow Law and Boston’s zoning code’s provisions protecting the Common as well as the Public Garden. 

We wanted to provide an update to let our Members and supporters know that we continue to monitor projects and seek out information to understand their potential impact, including shadows, on the three parks that we advocate for. As always, we look forward to continuing discussions with our elected officials, residents groups, business community, and developers to speak on behalf of our parks. If you have feedback to share with us on this topic, please email us at As updates become available we will be sure to share them.


Managing Beetles to Preserve Elm Trees


American Elm removal Commonwealth Avenue Mall June 17, 2014
A Commonwealth Avenue Mall Centenarian is removed due to Dutch elm disease (2014)

The Friends has been funding the expert care of trees since 1970 as part of our mission to preserve and enhance the Boston Common, Public Garden, and Commonwealth Avenue Mall. This work would not be possible without the financial support of our Members. We are always delighted when Members express a genuine interest in learning more about the details of the work we do. We noticed an increase in questions about tree care coming in over the past few months, and in particular inquiries about our work related to the elm bark beetle and Dutch elm disease, which seem to have been sparked by our Members Reception presentation (Digging In: Beyond the Roots of Urban Tree Care). We asked our contractor Christine Helie to explain some of the work she does for us. She is an entomologist and field scientist who works with her husband Normand at The Growing Tree.  Chris is directly involved in developing an Integrated Pest Management program to preserve the mature and young elm trees in our parks. Here is what she had to say:


Among the trees in the Public Garden, on the Boston Common and on Commonwealth Avenue, is a unique collection of elm trees. This valuable assortment of European, American and Asian elms are susceptible to Dutch elm disease (DED). This disease is caused by a fungus that compromises the conductive tissue of the tree and eventually kills it. The primary vector of the fungus is the European elm bark beetle. Through its breeding and feeding behavior, this bark beetle transfers DED from diseased trees to healthy trees.

In 2012, with the support of Greg Mosman, Tree Warden of the Boston Parks & Recreation Department and on behalf of the Friends and its tree care program, a monitoring and management system for this insect was designed as part of a new elm tree preservation program for the mature and young elm trees in the three parks. The manner in which insects are monitored and managed can vary depending on the habitat in which they exist. For our purposes, a three sided box of plywood, painted green was built to house an 18”x25” sticky trap with a pheromone lure attached in the center.

Pheromones are chemicals produced by an organism that elicit a response from another organism. They are used by insects or animals to communicate with individuals of the same species. Depending on the type of activity, different pheromones will be used to relay a message.

For example, ants use a trail pheromone to mark a path leading to food that other ants in the colony can find and follow. However, when encountering a dangerous situation they use an alarm pheromone to warn their nest mates. The pheromones used in our beetle traps signal to both male and female elm bark beetles that this is a great spot for breeding and laying eggs.

There are over 24 traps in use throughout the parks. From the beginning, our goal was to

Beetle counter, PG, May 23, 2014, EAJ
beetle trap

make them easy to access but discreet. Rather than placing unsightly posts throughout the parks, we decided to install our traps on trees at least 150 feet away from any elm trees.

Because the bark beetle is attracted to elm trees weakened by stress, one of the components in the pheromone mimics volatiles released by a stressed elm tree. As a result, the trees that we chose to place our traps on became substitute elms, luring the elm bark beetles away from the elm trees.

Pheromones are effective at very low concentrations and insect specific. This fact becomes evident when you compare some of the trees with traps to an actual elm tree. The vase shaped elm tree with upright branching is quite different from the pyramidal shaped Norway spruce with drooping branchlets.

The elm has a broad leaf with a serrated edge, whereas the spruce has needle-like foliage. The bark of an American elm tree has deep crevices that form diamond-shaped furrows, while the bark of a Norway spruce tree has thick round scales.

Regardless of these features though, the Norway spruce in the Public Garden has consistently captured high numbers of the European elm bark beetle on its trap.

Below are images showing the physical differences between Elm trees (top photos) and Norway Spruce trees(bottom).

Bark beetles appear to use different methods when locating a proper host tree. By crawling on the bark, they can sense the texture and determine whether the tree is susceptible to attack. Dispersing beetles are also guided by odors from weakened trees. From what we have observed in our program, it seems apparent that when the beetles land on a potential host, one of our stand-in elms, the odors detected override the physical clues they pick up from the tree. As a result the beetles continue to search for the source of the pheromones until they are caught on the trap or die trying to find the “elm.”

These traps have also allowed us to monitor the location, concentration, and pattern of movements of this disease host, helping to indicate the optimal times to treat, prune and, in some cases, remove a diseased tree.

Since their implementation, the elm bark beetle traps have become important tools in our fight against Dutch elm disease. The twenty four traps in use throughout the parks and surrounding areas are installed on thirteen different tree species. While these trees may be Oaks, Locusts, Maples, Lindens, or even a Norway spruce, they actually serve as substitute elms and are important allies in the preservation of our real elm tree population.

Landolt, Peter J. “Sex Attractant and Aggregation Pheromones of Male Phytophagous Insects.” American Entomologist Spring 1997 12-22. Print.

Anne Mostue: Walking into Blossoming Volunteer Opportunities

Friends Rose Brigade co-leaders Carl Foster and China Altman with Anne Mostue (right)

Anne Mostue became a Member of the Friends of the Public Garden in 2013 when she moved back to Boston after several years away. She was born here and grew up nearby. Boston radio listeners may find Anne’s name (and voice) familiar. She works as an anchor for Bloomberg Radio in Boston, 1200 AM and 94.5 FM HD-2. Previously, she was an on-air reporter/producer for WGBH, the NPR and PBS station airing in all six New England states.


We asked Anne how she became aware of the Friends of the Public Garden and this is what she told us: “I learned about the Friends when I became a volunteer rose gardener! One day I was walking through the Public Garden, admiring the flowers and missing the garden I had when I lived in Maine. It occurred to me that the city might need help, and wouldn’t that be an ideal volunteer opportunity? I made a few calls and found China Altman, who leads the Rose Brigade.”

The Friends of the Public Garden works in partnership with the city to care for the Common, Garden, and Mall. The volunteer Rose Brigade has worked for 28 years to care for the roses, including planting new bushes and weekly pruning, deadheading, and clean-up of beds. Anne says, “Working in the beds every week actually feels like an escape from the city. We’re dirty and completely absorbed in each bud and bush. I look forward to my time in the garden all week.”

Anne started with the Friends as a Rose Brigade volunteer and then began attending Friends events including those hosted by our Young Friends group. She has become a very active park steward who now also serves on our Council, and recently became co-chair of the Young Friends group.

We asked Anne to share something that she has learned from working with the Friends. She says, “People might be surprised to learn that the city can only do so much, so volunteers step in – to garden and also to advocate for the open space and its preservation.”



Message from Board Chair Anne Brooke

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Anne Brooke thanking Members and supporters at the 2015 Summer Party (Photo: Piece Harman)


Dear Friends,

It has been a wonderful year for the Friends and our three treasured greenspaces. Our work in 2015 has brought so many plans and projects to life that have improved the Boston Common, Public Garden, and Commonwealth Avenue Mall. One might say that how it all comes together is magical, and sometimes it feels that way, but it is actually the efforts and generous support of many individuals that make it possible.

Thank you to my fellow Board members, our dedicated Members, volunteers, donors, and our talented Executive Director and staff. Each of you makes a difference in all that you do.

You are these parks’ greatest supporters and advocate voices. Because of your contributions, more than $1 million was invested in parks care and programs in 2015, the restoration of the Garden’s George Robert White Memorial fountain will break ground in the spring of 2016, 10 trees and three benches are newly sponsored, and so much more.

We kindly ask that you continue your stewardship by renewing your Membership before the end of the year, inviting friends to join, and delighting someone with a gift of Membership.

We look forward to working together with you in the new year to continue raising the level of excellence in these three greenspaces we care for in partnership with the City. As you know, it takes a great deal of work, advocacy, and money to maintain and improve them; and sometimes a little magic, too. You are the magic that makes it happen and we can’t do it without you.

Wishing you a happy and safe holiday season,

Anne Brooke

Chair, Friends of the Public Garden